Double Vision: “Value Patterns” – Whitney Patterns Part 3

Hi and welcome back. In today’s article we’re going to talk about the next two patterns from the Whitney pattern set. These are somewhat similar to the two patterns we’ve discussed yesterday, though there is a profound difference. Just to quickly recap, here are the 6 Whitney patterns (today’s two patterns being highlighted): A piece of darker value in lighter values. A piece of lighter value in darker values. Large dark area and small light area in middle values. Large light area and small dark area in middle values. Gradation, in any direction, up, down, or across. “All-over pattern” as in textile design – an equal surface tension or visual strength throughout the rectangle. And here’s the reference image and…

Read More

Double Vision: “Value Patterns” – Whitney Patterns Part 2

Welcome back to my discussion on the Whitney Patterns. In the previous introductory post I talked about the Whitney patterns in general terms, arguing why we should care about patterns at all. In this part 2 we proceed to the fun part of the process – value allocation, that is an actual pattern utilization. We are going to break down each of the 6 Whitney patterns, demonstrating the principles behind each on an actual example, hopefully providing good amount of information so you too can start utilizing value patterns in your own work. Today we’re taking a look at the first two out of the total six patterns: A piece of darker value in lighter values. A piece of lighter…

Read More

Double Vision: “Value Patterns” – Whitney Patterns Part 1

Hi and welcome back. The “Double Vision” series has been a popular one with its initial launch back in July 2017. Now, finally, almost a year later, we bring you a new set of articles. This time our focus are value patterns. If you’re not familiar with the “Double Vision” series, it is a joint effort where I and my friend and artist Russell Black, tackle an identical scene based on a single photo reference and show both of our perspectives respectively. We explain, demonstrate and illustrate our individual approaches to solving the design problems the subject poses. As I said, this time around we’re focusing on value patterns. My task is to work with the “Whitney patterns” which I…

Read More

Double Vision: “Value Patterns” – Patterns of Depth

In this article I would like to go over the creation of what are called the “value plans of depth.” These are a different set of value plans than the ones being created by my co-author, Daniel Novotny, who is taking the “Whitney” pattern set and working with those in his part of this duel article. What are value plans of depth? Simply put, we are going to take a subject and break it into multiple plans of depth from foreground to background, trying to place the subject matter onto one or more separate planes. The subject must be broken up into simple shapes and then arranged so that when we add in our values, which will also be minimal,…

Read More

Elements of Design – Tonal Value: Part 4. Rhythm/Pattern

In my previous article about value keys I mentioned that design is all about manipulating values, including entire value keys, and that it is our responsibility to be conscious of the effects we want to achieve. From such mindset arising is a complete freedom of expression. However, to avoid anarchy, that is freedom without order, we need to look at things in context – we need to see the bigger picture. This is where value rhythm comes in. While being conscious of value key in a painting is already a step in the right direction, value pattern, or as I like to say, value/tonal rhythm, is taking into consideration not only the specific value key, but the painting’s overall abstract…

Read More

J. Herbin 1670 Rouge Hematite FP Ink

J. Herbin makes good inks, in my subjective opinion. I like the brand overall. I mentioned this in my previous review of one of their inks, the wonderful Cacao du Brésil. Cacao du Brésil, however is an ink from their regular line. Rouge Hematite, on the other hand, is an ink that is anything but regular. It came out a number of years ago. I remember. It was even reformulated several times in a relatively short period of time because what it attempted was new, exciting and unprecedented. This is the ink that started it all. This is the ink that was at the beginning of the shimmering craze. You may be forgiven for thinking this was an orange ink….

Read More

The Great FP Ink Lightfastness Project! Month 3

Following are the results after 3 month of sun exposure. If you’re interested to learn more about my lightfastness project I recommend you to read my initial article on this link. Note that in this article I only show inks that’s been terminated after 3 months of exposure. For previously terminated inks please refer to the Month 1 update and Month 2 update. Vintage 1946 Parker Quink w/ Solv-X Permanent Royal Blue ~1940’s Parker Quink w/ Solv-X Permanent Blue-Black Iron Gall Pelikan 4001 Blue Black Rohrer & Klingner Salix Iron Gall Dye – Red Sailor Jentle Grenade Montblanc Corn Poppy Red Dye – Violet Private Reserve Tanzanite Dye – Blue Diamine Majestic Blue Dye – Green Rohrer & Klingner Alt Goldgrün…

Read More

“Modeling” Video Lesson

Hi and welcome back to my website. Today I want to very briefly talk to you about the concept of modeling. This is an issue that’s not very often discussed and yet it holds the keys to understanding creative composition. Once you understand it a whole new world will open up to you. I know it did to me. The majority of painters today, mostly hobby or amateur painters (but also many professionals) – especially watercolorists, paint the values that are dictated to them by illumination. Professionals and advanced painters usually choose this method of organizing their values because they appreciate light and its effects. On the other hand, many of the hobby painters are unaware of their choice at…

Read More

Elements of Design – Tonal Value: Part 3. Value Keys

Thus far we discussed the importance of understanding and seeing value instead of color as well as demonstrated practical application of using value for building a strong paintings. Now that we understand these concepts, we may move away from the basic mechanics of value and color and take a look at the bigger picture. Value Keys Of course, when speaking of value/tonal keys, we don’t mean literal keys. Think music. Musician “keys” music just as we, painters, “key a painting”. Value key is the first step towards recognizing the bigger picture. Now we no longer concern ourselves with the values of individual shapes, rather we conceive the painting as an abstract value configuration. If you remember my article on Shape,…

Read More